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How To Use Native Instruments VC 160 For Mixing Drums



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How to Use Native Instruments VC 160 for Mixing Drums




If you are looking for a classic compressor that can add some punch and grit to your drum tracks, you might want to check out the Native Instruments VC 160. This plugin is based on one of the most famous VCA compressors found in studios all over the world, and it can help you achieve a bold and dirty sound that works well for hip hop, rock, and retro styles.




How to Use Native Instruments VC 160 for Mixing Drums



In this article, we will show you how to use the Native Instruments VC 160 for mixing drums, and what are some of the features and benefits of this plugin.


What is Native Instruments VC 160?




The Native Instruments VC 160 is a plugin that emulates a vintage VCA compressor that was popular in the 70s and 80s. VCA stands for Voltage Controlled Amplifier, and it means that the compressor uses multiple detectors to monitor the input signal and adjust the gain accordingly. VCA compressors are known for their fast attack and release times, which make them ideal for adding attack and definition to transient-rich sources like drums.


The Native Instruments VC 160 is part of the Vintage Compressors bundle by Native Instruments and Softube, which also includes the VC 76 (a FET compressor) and the VC 2A (an optical compressor). Each of these plugins has its own unique character and advantages, but in this article we will focus on the Native Instruments VC 160 and how it can enhance your drum mixes.


How to Use Native Instruments VC 160 for Mixing Drums?




The Native Instruments VC 160 has a simple and intuitive interface that allows you to adjust the main parameters of the compressor: threshold, ratio, attack, release, makeup gain, dry/wet mix, sidechain input, and low-cut detector. Here are some tips on how to use these controls for mixing drums:


  • Threshold: This determines how much compression is applied to the signal. The lower the threshold, the more compression. You can use the threshold to control how much of the drum dynamics you want to preserve or reduce. For example, if you want to make your kick drum more consistent and punchy, you can lower the threshold until you see some gain reduction on the meter. If you want to keep some of the natural variation and groove of your drum performance, you can set a higher threshold that only compresses the loudest peaks.



  • Ratio: This determines how much compression is applied once the signal exceeds the threshold. The higher the ratio, the more compression. You can use the ratio to control how aggressive or subtle you want the compression to be. For example, if you want to add some subtle glue and cohesion to your drum bus, you can use a low ratio like 2:1 or 4:1. If you want to add some more character and punch to your individual drum tracks, you can use a higher ratio like 8:1 or even infinity:1 (which means that no signal will pass above the threshold).



  • Attack: This determines how fast the compressor reacts to the signal exceeding the threshold. The faster the attack, the more compression. You can use the attack to control how much of the initial transient of your drum hits you want to preserve or reduce. For example, if you want to make your snare drum more snappy and crisp, you can use a fast attack that clamps down on the initial peak. If you want to make your snare drum more fat and thick, you can use a slower attack that lets some of the initial peak through.



Release: This determines how fast the compressor returns to its normal state after the signal drops below the threshold. The faster the release, the less compression. You can use the release to control how much of the sustain and tail of your drum hits you want to preserve or reduce. For example, if you want to make your cymbals more smooth and airy, you can use a fast release that lets go of the signal quickly. If you want to make your cymbals more dense and bright, you can use a slower release 04f6b60f66


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